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Back in 1996, Rabbi Finman was asked to speak to the niece of one of his students. After spending many hours answering her questions, the woman gave Rabbi Finman her e-mail address. Rabbi Finman wrote the woman a note and included in it a short insight into that week's Parsha and a short Chasidic story.

Realizing that this was something no one was yet doing,, Rabbi Finman sent the missive to his mailing list of about 30 people. Requests from recipients friends came pouring in. The next week Rabbi Finman sent the e-Parsha to 100 people. Within a year more than 2000 people were receiving it. Today, more than 14,000 receive the e-Parsha weekly and the requests keep coming in.

Succos 5784
Yom Kippur 5784
NItzavim-Vayelech 5783
Ki Savo 5783
Ki Teitzei 5783

Ki Savo 5783

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This week's YouParsha - www.youtube.com/watch?v=h30j8aHEgpA Blessings for all.

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This week we read the Parsha of Ki Savo, Deuteronomy 26 - 30. One of the mitzvahs mentioned in this Parsha is Bikurim - giving the first tree fruits to the Temple. We are told that one who keeps this commandment (It is not applicable today) will receive great blessing. This is alluded to in the verse, "This day Hashem your G'd has commanded you to keep all these statutes and ordinances. You shall guard them and do them with all your heart and soul." Rashi explains that the words, "Keep them and do them" are not to be understood as a command, but as a blessing. The idea of observing the commandment of first fruits causing blessing is explained by the Alter Rebbe, the first Lubavitcher Rebbe in Lekuitei Torah:

"This day" refers to Rosh Hashanah. (One of the allegories as to why this Parsha is read prior to Rosh Hashanah.) First fruit is called reishis tevuasa. The word reishis is related to rosh. Both mean beginning. The concept of first fruits relates to the essence of the soul as it is rooted in the essence of the Almighty. That pristine level of soul prefaces the creation and is the reason for the creation.

The duty expected of us on Rosh Hashanah is to accept the Almighty as king. We do this every day while reciting the Shma, but that is merely an internal expression of the soul. On Rosh Hashanah we express our acceptance through the very essence of the soul. This is our "personal" first fruits.

First fruits are only good if there are fruits to follow. Rosh Hashanah is just the beginning. Every day, we must produce fruits, learn Torah and do good deeds. About this the Torah says, "You will keep them and do them," meaning, receive blessing from the essence of Hashem.

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There was once a country doctor that lived in a small village in Poland. He was a very charitable fellow but would let people know it. It once happened, that he was riding in his carriage when he chanced upon the Rabbi of the village walking along the road. He offered the Rav a ride, who gladly accepted.

During the trip, the doctor struck up a conversion. "You know," he said, "I never charge poor people who can't afford my services." The rabbi coolly responded, "Nu, I do the same thing." The man was a little taken aback. OK, so the Rav wasn't impressed, but what does he mean? Perhaps he also doesn't charge poor people for his services.

The doctor continued, "Why yes, if someone is too poor to afford medication, I will supply the necessary apothecaries, free of charge." The Rabbi responded, "Nu, I do that too." The doctor did not understand. What medicines did he prescribe? He concluded that there must be instances where the Rav supplied the needs of the poor.

Still trying to impress his passenger, the doctor boasted, "There are times when I will prescribe a rest trip to a resort. If the poor person cannot afford the trip, I will pay for his trip and the money lost from not working." The Rabbi simply responded, "Nu, I do that too." The doctor could not contain himself. "You mean to tell me that you provide vacations for your congregants?" "Not at all," responded the Rabbi. "What I meant was that I also tell everyone all the good things I do. The bad things, I don't even tell myself."

This month is Elul, we prepare for Rosh Hashanah. We said before that it is a time for spiritual stocktaking. Not only are we to analyze the accounts receivable, we must also consider the accounts payable.

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In memory of Yisroel Yaakov ben Hirsh Leib Niftar Kislev 26, 5783 and

Chana bas Dovber HaLevi Niftar Teves 8, 5783.

Chaim Elozar ben Dovber HaLevi Niftar Lag B'Omer 5783

May their families be comforted among all the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem.

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Listen Weekly to the Jewish Hour Podcast. www.rabbifinman.com/radio. Now available on iTunes, spotify, audacy, stitcher and wherever you park your podcasts.

The Torah e-Parsha is a project of Jewish Ferndale. For information on sponsoring the Torah e-Parsha in memory or for the recovery of a loved one, in honor of a simcha or you just feel like being nice, contact via reply. All contributions are tax deductible. Please forward this message to as many friends and associates as you like. 2023 by Herschel Finman.

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In memory of Yisroel Yaakov ben Hirsh Leib Niftar Kislev 26, 5783 and

Chana bas Dovber HaLevi Niftar Teves 8, 5783.

Chaim Elozar ben Dovber HaLevi Niftar Lag B'Omer 5783

May their families be comforted among all the mourners of Zion and Jerusalem.

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Listen Weekly to the Jewish Hour Podcast. www.rabbifinman.com/radio. Now available on iTunes, spotify, audacy, and wherever you park your podcasts.

The Torah e-Parsha is a project of Jewish Ferndale. For information on sponsoring the Torah e-Parsha in memory or for the recovery of a loved one, in honor of a simcha or you just feel like being nice, contact via reply. All contributions are tax deductible. Please forward this message to as many friends and associates as you like. 2023 by Herschel Finman.


Contact Rabbi Finman for information on sponsoring the e-Parsha

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